Reviews

After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory by Alasdair MacIntyre

lydiag's review against another edition

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3.0

it’s wild to me how the idea of changing virtues/emotivism has been around since the 1950’s and is still continuing today. this book is relevant now as it ever has been. i will say, a lot of it was very hard to understand, and very very deep. if you want to understand it, i think it would take a literally eternity to read

dreams_of_leander's review against another edition

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challenging informative reflective slow-paced

3.5

em_frost's review against another edition

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challenging informative reflective medium-paced

5.0

this book was such an interesting read as a philosophy student! macintyre did and excellent job laying out his history of virtue, and close to the end we get his definitions and a bigger explanation of how he’s looking at the problem he posed in the beginning. this book is not of the prescriptive variety, it’s descriptive and very well done. 
i will admit, the pace at which i had to read this book for school was brutal. long readings and not enough time to let the readings sink in made it hard to appreciate at the time. but looking back, it was well worth the time and effort to read!

aegagrus's review against another edition

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4.0

Not going to comment here on the argument as such, but I was quite impressed by the book's rhetorical structure. 

glen's review against another edition

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challenging slow-paced

3.0

rickcummingsjr's review against another edition

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5.0

Probably the most challenging book I've ever read, but so compelling that even though it took way longer than most books to get through, I never lost interest. It will take a long time to think through all the possible arguments MacIntyre lays out -- I will be thinking about this book for a very long time.

jared's review against another edition

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slow-paced

5.0

loppear's review against another edition

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3.0

Does Aristotle need saving, and can he save modern society? Mostly clear writing, and quite cognizant of the rebuttals and responses his arguments bring up. The demand for historicism and critiques of 'emotivism' and of most modern analytical philosophies attempts at rationally justifying morality is well-sounded, though ultimately the prescribed return to a theory of virtues embedded in practice, institutional authority, and socially-connected human narratives is unconvincing as a solution to the incommensurability of modern plural societies' disagreements.
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