Reviews

Il giro del mondo in 72 giorni, by Nellie Bly

wingedwalls's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging inspiring reflective fast-paced

4.0


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graceburke's review against another edition

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3.0

the first half was so interesting and compelling and well written and the second half simply was not rip

juannaranjo's review against another edition

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4.0

Este libro me ha parecido un documento histórico de primer orden con un interés grandioso.
De la mano de Nellie vemos, en primera persona, cómo era el mundo a finales del siglo XIX. Y lo hacemos de una manera veraz y fidedigna. En serio, es un documento histórico de valor incalculable.
Es fascinante ver cómo una mujer de la época se enfrenta al periodismo de una forma intrépida y valiente, poniéndose en la primera línea del fuego y experimentando en su carne las dificultades de los artículos que investiga.
Mi relato favorito ha sido el que da nombre al libro: es una experiencia antropológica grandiosa leer la descripción de una periodista del estado de las distintas sociedades y ciudades en las que recala el viaje de la aventurera.

jackquelinereads's review against another edition

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4.0

Through Bly's journalism during the Gilded age (before women were allowed to vote) was ground breaking. She went places and did things that women had never done before. Her record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days with one dress on her person and one luggage was one of her most well known exploits. Her most daring undertaking was purposefully exposing the monstrosities that happen to women in Mental Institutions. Thus she got herself committed to a women's insane asylum for ten days in order to write a startling eposé of the abuses of the system. Bly also risked imprisonment in Mexico for writing critical pieces on the authoritarian government.

What Nelly Bly pioneered, is that facts alone don't change the world through journalism, but rather stories are what moves readers. So make your story as great as possible. Make your facts as enticing as possible. And little by little, you can change perspective's around the world.

ziggywiggy's review against another edition

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adventurous informative reflective

library_brandy's review against another edition

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4.0

A lot of this is fascinating--investigative journalism from the late nineteen century! But the title story killed my momentum. Nellie's journey around the world is complicated--I hesitate to call her racist, because she is a product of her time, but that time was pretty racist, so there we go. The only culture she didn't speak disparagingly of was the Japanese, and even while she enjoyed her time there she's viewing the people as zoo exhibits rather than actual people with lives and customs. She overlooks her enormous privilege and exhibits a lot of self-serving bias--the good things are due to her hard work and determination; bad things are due to weather and other circumstances.

This collection is edited from full pieces and it's possible I'm missing some context, but there are always problematic time that come up when you read things that happened in less enlightened times. I'm sure someone may read this a century-plus from now and wonder just what i was thinking.

aria_tsv's review against another edition

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informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

4.0

keruin's review against another edition

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I loved reading about Nellie Bly in her own words! What a window into the time she was writing. I adored her no-nonsense attitude about it all, in the midst of a world that seriously did not take her seriously at first.

marknemeth's review against another edition

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3.0

The greatest value of this is in being able to read about how Americans in the late 19th century thought about technology, other cultures, and feminism. It was interesting to see what has changed and what remains similar.

ehmannky's review against another edition

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adventurous informative medium-paced

3.0

Nellie Bly was certainly a charming and entertaining writer, I'll give her that. However, major mark downs for Bly's spectacular racism she exhibited on her trip around the world, specifically her Sinophobia I honestly felt it was so paradoxical that she was so bigoted towards so many people in China (and Asia more generally, but it most clearly comes out in the parts where she travels to China and Hong Kong) when she generally held relatively progressive views towards other ethnic and racial minorities she encountered. Most of her attitudes towards the mentally ill, women, the working class, etc. were so progressive that it was so jarring to hear her parrot attitudes so strongly echoed by conservatives. The only reason I wouldn't rate this lower is because this edition specifically has editor's notes that highlights her racist behavior, and the endnotes take care to point out where she was wrong or just flat out lied for a more exciting story.
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