Reviews

Amelia Earhart: This Broad Ocean by S. S. Taylor

hereistheend's review against another edition

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2.0

cute but shallow

sandraagee's review against another edition

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3.0

An odd little blend of biography and storytelling as we get the story of Amelia Earhart's first crossing of the Atlantic Ocean from the perspective of a young girl living in the town where Earhart's flight is set to take off. As with other graphic novels from the Center for Cartoon Studies ([b:Houdini: The Handcuff King|487581|Houdini The Handcuff King|Jason Lutes|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1175179487s/487581.jpg|475857], for example) the art is well executed in three colors: black, white, and blue.

maseface's review against another edition

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hopeful informative lighthearted medium-paced

3.25

carleesi's review against another edition

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3.75

I liked the episodic focus of the book, but the intro was what made this special. The way Eileen Collins wrote about Earhart and how she impacted her own career was so moving. A beautiful homage.

sngick's review

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5.0

Gorgeous blue color palette and a story about Earhart I was not familiar with

corncobwebs's review against another edition

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Very engrossing and a very quick read. Details Earhart's historic flight across the Atlantic. Told from the perspective of a girl named Grace, who is very interested in Earhart's endeavors. Interestingly, since the story is told from Grace's perspective, we only get to experience what happens before the flight, and then we see Grace's jubilation when she learns that Earheart has landed safely on the other side of the Atlantic. There is nothing about the actual flight. I wonder why that is, because Earhart wrote a whole book about that flight, so there's no shortage of factual information to draw from. The story ends by fast-forwarding to several years later, with a grown-up Grace discovering that Earhart has disappeared during her attempt to circumnavigate the Earth by plane. I felt like this totally opens up an avenue for Taylor and Towle to continue - and complete - Earhart's story. As for the art, I thought it was interesting how the only color used is this light blue color. It represents the sky, obviously, but I also felt like it was referencing the ocean; the ocean was important to Earhart because her crossing of the Atlantic was what made her famous, and because she ultimately disappeared over the ocean. I like when artists use the medium to convey some kind of message. Overall, I really liked it and would definitely recommend it.

calistareads's review against another edition

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3.0

This is an interesting perspective on Amelia Earharts crossing of the atlantic. She comes to the town of Trepassey, Newfoundland to refuel before going across the Atlantic. It's the last place of land before she went. The town is very curious about Amelia and the other pilots trying to make it across the ocean.

A girl writes for the local paper and she admires Amelia. Eventually she gets a little interview and writes up a piece. Amelia is ground for a few weeks. Her co-pilot is drunk, or the plane can't get out of the water, or the weather is bad. People begin to think she will not make it.

It's not the most detailed story of Amelia, but it is part of that historical trip and a little tiny glimpse into the woman who made history. Anyone interested in history from a unique perspective from middle grade readers up might enjoy this. The art is simple enough to tell a story. I find these historical graphic novels interesting. This is a quick read.

erine's review against another edition

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2.0

The monochromatic illustrations were charmingly old-fashioned, but I felt this was less about Amelia Earhart and more about strong women role models and the effect they have on young girls.

A good read, and very girl-empowering, but not as much of a biography as I thought it was going to be.

likesbooks's review against another edition

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5.0

A great introduction to the legendary Amelia Earhart and her connection to Canada.
Today marks what would be her 120th birthday
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