Reviews

Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story by Chuck Klosterman

hunkydory's review

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informative reflective fast-paced

2.75

tripolie's review

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2.0

Got halfway through. Couldn't handle groaning any more. This book has not aged well.

cecefaulkner's review

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adventurous lighthearted fast-paced

2.5

I enjoyed the band discussions but the way chuck delivered literally everything in this story was so narcissistic I do not like him

soulpopped's review

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5.0

i don't know why i care about his past loves but he makes me care. it's such good writing that i could read anything he writes and enjoy it.

chrstnareads's review

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5.0

Another collection of essays and observations, but within the frame of Klostermans' travels across country to rock 'n' roll landmarks like The Chelsea Hotel, the crossroads where Duane Allman died, the site of the Great White nightclub fire in West Warwick, RI and many more. It's safe to say that as a key first-person character, Klosterman takes part in more self-indulgent writing here than in his other works. But, it still works. And it was the main inspiration for my 33-page senior manifesto/thesis -- "The Self-Indulgent, Self-Referential Journalist: How Credibility is Established in the Pop-Culture Writings of Chuck Klosterman." (Sadly, the title might have been the best part of that paper, haha)

seshutts's review

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I liked Chuck Klosterman more than I expected to. There something about comparing his ex-girlfriends to KISS members that I found awesome. Very funny, only a tiny bit too self absorbed.

tseverhart's review

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dark funny informative reflective fast-paced

2.5

meagan_louise's review

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2.0

This is a memoir from a writer from SPIN magazine who is writing about death and rock and roll. How they are linked and how a true rocker only becomes a god when he dies. Or that is what I think he is traveling from New York to Seattle by car, visiting various places where rock star died. From the Allman Brothers to Kurt Cobain.

The book itself seems to be how he views his life through music. Which is common and I would imagine a writer for a music magazine would do this...I think I'd be surprised if he didn't. The book also follows him on his road trip...the various inconsequential place he saw and the various people he met with along the way. He discusses heavily the three loves of his life (at the time) and he seems to take the road trip to think of all of them and their jointed pasts, where the relationships are in the present, and where the future (if any) may hold for them.

Over all, this was a slightly interesting read. The rock n' roll history parts were interesting and his take on music and certain acts were also entertaining. HIs tales of his relationships were intriguing, but in a "i'm driving by a car accident and want to morbidly see if there is a dead body on the road" intriguing.

What's nice though is Chuck Klosterman feels this way too.

glendaleereads's review

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3.0

I enjoyed this book because the writing was humorous and i found a lot of my own thoughts about certain issues in society (like the super bowl) relatable. However, I found myself more interested in Chucks love triangle rather than the deaths of some of the rock n roll figures he discusses, and this isn't because I'm a romantic or don't like rock n roll but because he sort of flys through the events that claimed the lives of these musicians (or maybe that's just my opinion) and I found that I had to google some of the details because he left me wanting more. However I will be checking out some of his other novels...so I guess I liked him.

jessicaleza's review

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1.0

This book is like drinking backwash.