elusivity's review

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4.0

As my Buddhist reading stack up, it has been interesting to see how different authors present the same basic teachings through the lenses of their differing personality.

Compared to Jack Kornfield, Bhante Gunaratana is down-to-earth, kindly but no-nonsense teacher who says, Do this thus and so, practice, practice, don't get distracted by the fluffy joy and bliss that are merely side-effects and attachment, follow the precepts, work hard, concentrate, and you will eventually reach enlightenment.

I hear you; I will try.

francat92's review

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informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

3.5

benropp's review

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5.0

This is an excellent treatment of the essential teachings of Buddhism, couched in terms of self help spirituality - at least insofar as it refers to the noble eightfold path as 8 steps (see the 12 steps). That's really the only concession to self-help-speak. Otherwise it's pure Theravada Buddhism from a wise old monk.

hannahchartier's review

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5.0

This is the most helpful book on Buddhism that I've read!

torvosaur's review

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5.0

A marvellous exposition of the four noble truths and the noble eightfold path - in simple language, and in a way that is understandable to a lay person, free of the self-importance and high handedness of spiritual literature.

The Buddha's path has been given for us to discover on our own, and follow for a happier life, and maybe even eventual enlightenment. You might agree or not agree, but the path provides you a framework of ethical living and self-development at par with the Stoics, the Epicureans and other famous philosophical schools of thought.

Definitely recommended for everyone seriously interested in practising Buddhism.

mikegreg85's review

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4.0

The principles that are shown in this book is a great way for anyone to live a more wholesome life. If you follow the way of the Buddha you will be a better person. Even if you’re not Buddhist, there are some things you could put in your everyday process in order to be a better person.

elusivity's review against another edition

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4.0

As my Buddhist reading stack up, it has been interesting to see how different authors present the same basic teachings through the lenses of their differing personality.

Compared to Jack Kornfield, Bhante Gunaratana is down-to-earth, kindly but no-nonsense teacher who says, Do this thus and so, practice, practice, don't get distracted by the fluffy joy and bliss that are merely side-effects and attachment, follow the precepts, work hard, concentrate, and you will eventually reach enlightenment.

I hear you; I will try.

sdc's review against another edition

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4.0

Probably closer to five stars than four...other than "The Power of Now" this book has been the most helpful guide for my own spiritual path. Since spirituality varies widely from person to person, that may not be the base for everyone, of course. But, if you're exploring Buddhism this is a very good place to visit along your path.

danarama's review against another edition

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A very lucid explanation of Buddhism's Noble Eightfold Path, and meant to be a user's manual (as it were) for the path. Whereas Mindfulness In Plain English was less specifically Buddhist, EMSH definitely is.

Bhante writes with a gentle niceness that reminds me a lot of Thich Nhat Hanh.

Read this in ebook form but I ordered a used paperback copy from Powells for easier reference and to fill with sticky notes.
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